Monthly Resource Collection: September 2020

This month I found myself listening to music (the new Katy Perry album Smile, and the In the Heights soundtrack) and true crime podcasts (see: Weird on the Rocks and My Favorite Murder) during my morning workouts and makeup sessions. I don’t believe this was an attempt to distract myself from our current reality, but somehow it does feel nostalgic to listen to things as if we were pre-pandemic. To rest your mind as you prepare for another day. Fall reminds me of true crime podcasts and training for half marathons; running through the leaves and rain. It reminds me of wrapping up my wedding season at work just in time for a big vacation. This year is obviously different.

However, in between my distractions, mental “breaks,” or privileged lapses from reality I did go back to my morning ritual, complete with coffee, a lit candle, and a book, followed by fifteen minutes of meditation to absorb what I’d read. And this month I dove into Ta-Nehisi Coates, requiring extra time for absorption.

This month’s resource guide focuses highly on Coates’ work because I am fascinated by it. His writing reads more beautifully than anything I’ve picked up in a decade, like poetry with poignant edges. I cannot believe it’s taken me this long to sit with it and I hope you’ll join me.

Books:

Quit Like A Woman: The Radical Choice to Not Drink in a Culture Obsessed With Alcohol takes a close look at the normalized relationship most of us have with alcohol, it’s effects on our mental and physical health, and how the constructed “alcoholic / non-alcoholic” binary created and enforced mostly through Alcoholics Anonymous-style programs designed by white men, and for men is harmful for women looking to quit. Whitaker examines the ways alcohol is marketed specifically toward females, why women choose to drink in the first place, and why teaching women to give up their power, intuition, and control over their own lives in order to become sober is a damaging and patriarchal idea.
Ta-Nehisi Coates writes this book as a open letter to his teenage son, explaining the complexities and dual realities of navigating this world, and specifically this country, as a Black man, in a Black body. Coates explains that there is a separation between lived realities, or worlds. There is what is true, and there is the “dream” – an illusion of democracy built on stolen land using labor stolen from Black bodies. The dreamers continue living this comfortable illusion, given the truth but in denial or refusal of it, the reality that our very democracy and every institution therein exists only because of current and historical violence against the Black body. Are we capable and willing of awakening?
We Were Eight Years in Power is a collection of powerful essays written by Ta-Nehisi Coates meant to chronicle the years President Barack Obama was in office and the dangerous white supremacist backlash that followed. Fear of a Black President, The Case For Reparations, and The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration are some of the works included. Each essay is prefaced with context and personal memoir making the collection even more compelling.

Notable Podcast Episodes:

The Rich Roll Podcast Episode 547: We are Water: Erin Brokovich on Pollutants, Politics & People Power https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-rich-roll-podcast/id582272991?i=1000491955278
In this episode Rich Roll and Erin Brokovich talk about her new book Superman’s Not Coming and discuss the roles corporations and government really play in protecting our environment and the water we think is safe.

Bookstores to support: https://www.semicolonchi.com https://eurekabookshop.com https://keybookstore.com

Monthly Resource Collection: August 2020

Hello Readers!

This month flew by. Between going camping for my husband’s birthday (a nice break with absolutely no cell phone reception) and what seems like an endless list of work responsibilities since resuming operations, I simply haven’t consumed as much information. I found myself reading more as a quiet method of active meditation, and watching less. Sometimes the noise of the world becomes too much for me, and I just need extensive periods of quiet time or immersive time in a good book. I’m learning to be okay with that.

I also hosted my first unlearning.is.rad book club meeting, through Zoom of course. Because I redirected my book club to social justice themes, I will include our selections in monthly resource blogs.

I hope you will continue to find these posts useful, and inspiring.

-Liz, The Real Life Vegan Wife

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Books:

  • Born A Crime: Stories From A South African Childhood, Trevor Noah

Born A Crime is without question one of my favorite books ever. This wonderfully written memoir chronicles the early life of Trevor Noah – now the host of The Daily Show – during the dismantling of apartheid in South Africa. Noah tells much of the story through his mother’s experiences, which forms a more intersectional and personal narrative around topics of racial segregation, poverty, colorism, and sexism. “The personal is political” is woven throughout each chapter as systems clearly help to shape personal outcomes. I haven’t laughed or cried harder reading a book, probably ever, and I think everyone should read this.

  • So you want to talk about race, Ijeoma Oluo

*Book Club Pick

So you want to talk about race is an accessible introduction to topics like privilege, intersectionality, cultural appropriation, microaggressions, police brutality, and the school to prison pipeline. Oluo outlines effective ways to engage in difficult conversations about these topics, while also emphasizing the importance of presenting facts and explaining the real-world implications of incidents that many would consider isolated personal events, but are in fact symptoms of a greater and more complex racist system.

  • The Undocumented Americans, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

Cornejo Villavicencio beautifully wrote this book to tell stories about people. People who have immigrated to the United States, people who are undocumented, people who cannot be simply defined as one dimensional “workers,” or “dreamers.” People who’s worth should not be tied to the word “workers” to make their existence more palatable, or to justify their existence as a human being. They are complex and emotional and flawed; they experience joy and sadness, grief and happiness. They live their lives, sometimes exciting, sometimes mundane, but these people are defined by more than what they can produce for a country that renders them invisible.

Bookstores to Support:

https://keybookstore.com

https://www.semicolonchi.com

https://eurekabookshop.com

https://bookshop.org/shop/Elizabeths

Notable Podcast Episodes:

  • America Did What?! W/ Blair Imani & Kate Robards, “Episode 1: Redlining and the GI Bill.” 7/3/20

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/america-did-what/id1519365900?i=1000485381107

This episode explains exactly what the GI Bill entailed and why many Black Americans were excluded from it’s benefits because of practices like “redlining,” and the far reaching implications of this systematic denial of government provided services.

  • The Robcast, “We Hung Our Harps.” 7/21/20

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-robcast/id956742638?i=1000485667858

This sermon-style talk helps name the feelings of grief and disillusionment many Americans are currently feeling as we strive for a better way of being and let go of what we thought we had.

*For an in-depth analysis of my feelings around this topic, see my post The Word of the Day is Lament: https://thereallifeveganwife.com/2020/08/08/the-word-of-the-day-is-lament/

Must Read Articles:

“Anthropologist Wade Davis on how COVID-19 signals the end of the American era.”

The First Monthly Resource Collection! July 2020

Hello Readers!

As promised, my plan moving forward is to dedicate the last Saturday of every month to rounding up many of the useful resources I consumed each month. I will include a brief description of what to expect from each, a photo, and a link when applicable, but my intention is not to summarize them for you. Rather, I hope these posts can be a spring board that sends you on your own unlearning journey and encourages you to do your own research.

Enjoy! I can’t wait to hear your feedback.

PS: I read A LOT of articles. If something you’re interested in is pictured but not listed, please comment below and I’ll send you a link.

-Liz, The Real Life Vegan Wife

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Books:

  • The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, Richard Rothstein

The Color of Law explains how the United States federal government, and individual state governments used (and continue to use) housing policy to create racial segregation. Many of us assume that the racial makeup of neighborhoods and cities are a product of “de facto” segregation when in fact it is a result of “de jure” or direct and lawful housing policy.

  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander

The New Jim Crow argues that since its founding, America has gone through several institutional forms of racial control, one simply evolving into the next to reflect society in that present moment. Beginning with chattel slavery, evolving into Jim Crow segregation, and currently resulting in mass incarceration, Alexander explains that each institution accomplishes the same end: the disenfranchisement and criminalization of Black people and Non-Black People of Color, resulting in a racial “underclass.”

  • Hood Feminism: Notes From The Women That A Movement Forgot, Mikki Kendall

Hood Feminism is an excellent and accessible analysis of systems of privilege and oppression through the lens of intersectional feminism. Kendall explains that issues such as housing access, food security, and gun violence (among many others) disproportionately affect Black Women and Women of Color and have therefore been ignored by mainstream white feminism. She argues that these issues are feminist issues and that without addressing them collectively, patriarchy will continue to subjugate all women.

Bookstores to Support:

https://keybookstore.com

https://www.semicolonchi.com

https://eurekabookshop.com

https://bookshop.org/shop/Elizabeths

Notable Podcast Episodes:

  • Code Switch, “Why Now White People?” 6/16/20

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/16/878963732/why-now-white-people

This episode talks about the sudden surge of support from white people for the Black Lives Matter movement after the murder of George Floyd.

  • The Rich Roll Podcast, Episode 529, “John Lewis & John Salley Are Black In America.” 6/29/20

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-rich-roll-podcast/id582272991?i=1000480111209

In this podcast episode, Rich Roll interviews John Salley, a long-time vegan and the first basketball player in history to win four NBA championships with three different teams, and John Lewis, aka The Badass Vegan, a vegan activist, athlete, and co-director of the new documentary They’re Trying to Kill Us.

  • American History Tellers, Season 13, Episodes 1-5, “Tulsa Race Massacre.”

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/tulsa-race-massacre-the-promised-land/id1313596069?i=1000440022243

In this five-episode series, learn about the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 and the destruction of the Greenwood neighborhood, also known as “Black Wall Street,” by a racist white mob and a complicit police force.

Movies:

  • 13th

This documentary is available on Netflix and focuses on the meaning of the 13th Amendment, racial inequality in the United States, and why Black and Non Black People of Color make up a disproportionately high number of incarcerated individuals in this country.

  • The Hate U Give

This film tells the story of Starr Carter, a Black teenage girl learning to find her voice while constantly switching worlds and personalities between the Black community she calls home and the predominantly wealthy white prep school she attends.

Based on the novel by Angie Thomas

  • Dark Waters

Dark Waters tells the true story of how the DuPont corporation knowingly poisoned waterways, soil, animals and people in West Virginia with PFOA, a chemical commonly found in Teflon products.

Based on the New York Times Magazine article “The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare” by Nathaniel Rich.