Women In Business Series: Lorena Alves Owner On The Lo Swimwear

1. Briefly describe yourself and your business.

Hey! Lorena Alves here. I am a 30 year old Brazilian native. I moved to Boston with my family in 1997 when I was seven years old. I went to The University of Massachusetts, Amherst and moved to Humboldt County after I graduated in 2013. I design for and run the company I own, On The Lo Swimwear. 

2. Tell us about what you sell! Why is your brand unique? 

We sell Brazilian versatile swimwear. On The Lo Swimwear is a brand for women by women. We advocate for fair wages and shop locally to support other small businesses. I design the swimsuits in California and send the designs to Giovana, in Brazil, who assembles and creates the pieces. I choose the colors and patterns and Giovana shops locally in Brazil for all the materials. In an effort to support both the American and Brazilian economies and honor my roots, we have chosen to create authentic Brazilian swimsuits in Brazil. 

3. Why did you specifically decide to design swimwear? 

All my life I struggled to find the the perfect bikini- one I’d feel comfortable and sexy and beautiful in. I used to buy bikini tops in the United States and bikini bottoms in Brazil because I’ve always loved their flattering cheeky cuts. I have been fond of swimwear forever! However, I never would’ve predicted that one day I would design my own suits! I noticed the lack of swimwear options in the area I lived in and decided to bridge the gap by providing flattering swimwear for women of all shapes and sizes. I used to say I wasn’t creative, but found my creative outlet designing swimsuits.  

4. Trying on and even wearing swimwear can be a challenging and vulnerable process for many people. How do you approach this challenge? 

I feel that because swimwear hasn’t been designed for women by women, we haven’t had cuts that are made to fit our bodies. This has created an uncomfortability around swimwear. At On the Lo we approach this challenge by creating comfortable, flattering, and sexy bikinis for all body types. We mix and match sizes and styles and can make custom bikinis for your precise measurements. Our suits are soft, flattering and accentuating. We also expanded our line to include non-cheeky cuts for the babes that prefer more coverage. We are all about empowering women to be confident in their own skin!

5. What is beauty to you? How does this idea translate into your swim line?

Beauty is confidence. Beauty is loving yourself and living in your divine feminine power while embracing your true self. Beauty on the inside is kindness, generosity and caring- letting your love shine through in all you do. We design suits that remind women of how beautiful they are! Our slogan:

Empowered, Genuine, and Free

represents the powerful queen that loves herself fully and lives in her truth. 

6. What is one valuable lesson you’ve learned from working with people of all different shapes and sizes, backgrounds and life experiences? 

Working with people of all different shapes, sizes, backgrounds and life experiences has taught me to appreciate authenticity and diversity. We are all so special and have our own paths, yet we can share and learn so much from one another. Working with a diverse population has taught me greater awareness, understanding, and acceptance of differing beliefs and customs.

7. What is one piece of advice you have for someone wanting to try your line? 

If you’re interested in trying our swimsuits don’t hesitate to contact us! I offer home visits where I bring you our inventory and help you find the perfect suit. Whether you like cheeky styles or more coverage, we have many styles for you. 

8. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever gotten?

“If you love what you do you’ll never work a day in your life.” I love my job and the joy it brings, not only for myself, but for my clients as well! I am so thankful for the opportunity to dress so many women and to work and connect with them. I finally found a job where I am able to be creative but also make a difference in women’s lives. 

9. What has been the biggest challenge and biggest reward from owning your own business? 

The biggest challenge for me as an entrepreneur is time management. Sometimes it’s difficult to see the light at the end of the tunnel, but I have to keep pushing forward. As an entrepreneur it is challenging to navigate a new business and learn what to do, what not to do, and how to best delegate my time. The biggest reward has been the impact that my brand has created. I love reading my client’s testimonials and feedback. They inspire me to keep creating, and to keep the momentum going. I have met so many amazing people on my journey. I am forever grateful for them, and for the people I will meet in the future.

10. What is one book that changed your life? Why?

Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins. This book taught me perseverance – it taught me to change my mindset and to keep going no matter what. Goggins shows us that our bodies are capable of doing much more than we can imagine. He transformed himself into one of America’s fittest athletes through self-discipline, mental toughness, and hard work. Goggins believes that many of us limit ourselves by operating at only forty percent of our true capability. Only when we callous our minds through the regular stepping out of our comfort zones can we move beyond it. We are stronger than we think! 

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https://ontheloswimwear.com

@ontheloswimwear

707-498-1832

Contact@ontheloswimwear.com

The Word of the Day is Lament

I haven’t written much about my experiences or feelings navigating the last four or five months. I still have a lot to work through before I feel clear enough to discuss my thoughts regarding the traumatic closure of my business, my scramble to keep afloat, the uprisings all over the country and the way our mainstream political discourse has changed. I’m still struggling daily. Every crack and flaw in our feeble system has finally been exposed. Watching and living that reality through sober eyes has been an experience. It will continue to be for some time. Accepting that new reality is where I currently reside on my grief journey.

In the face of challenge or trauma I place myself in a constant state of motion. I’ve learned this through years of writing and a year of weekly therapy. Moving fast helps me to feel productive, like I’m in total control, which I understand is rooted in a deep history of societal ideology promoting capitalism and individualistic bootstrap culture in this country. The guilt I feel is constant; it’s enough to make me sick to my stomach at the thought of possibility of failure. It is with me daily. Were my parent’s sacrifices for nothing? If I’m not producing something, I feel worthless. I would be lying if I said that being Mexican / American – the daughter and granddaughter of people who worked hard and sacrificed everything to give me a better life – hasn’t influenced my relationship with work and my value. With production and permission to exist. It has. The extent to which I feel these things is something I’m working through now. And it’s tough.

I’ve gone through months of feeling unpredictable and intense emotions. And months of trying my best to stay busy and channel them into something tangible and useful. But for the last couple of weeks I’ve been feeling something different. Something that I couldn’t name until earlier this week when I listened to Rob Bell’s podcast episode “We Hung Our Harps” on The Robcast.

I listened to it three times.

“By the rivers of Babylon we sat and

wept

when we remembered Zion.

There on the poplars

we hung our harps,

for there our captors asked us for

songs,

our tormentors demanded songs of

joy;

they said, “Sing us one of the songs

of Zion!”

How can we sing the songs of the Lord

while in a foreign land?”

-Psalm 137

Although I was raised in a strictly Christian household, I am not religious. I fall somewhere on the scale between atheist and agnostic beliefs. What I appreciate about Rob Bell is how effective he is at using the bible to teach lessons that make sense no matter what your religious beliefs may be. However problematic, these words spoke to me, on a symbolic level. They helped me to begin processing that emptiness I started to feel a few weeks after being back to work. I feel disconnected from everything that was taken from me so easily. From my job, from my business, from my relationship with work and to the part I play as a cog in a larger broken capitalist system in this country – that does not care if I succeed or fail.

Bell made two specific points in regards to the Psalm above that gave meaning to my feelings of emptiness and disappointment. The first is that we are on the cusp of a great, collective “lament.” We, as a country, had the opportunity to make something great. To use our privilege in this world for good, and we largely did not. We blew it. And now we’re here. “By the rivers of Babylon, we sat and wept, when we remembered Zion.” We’re mourning many of our privileges, but also mourning our fantasies. The ones we had about who we were as a country and “how far we’d come.” I feel like the first stage of this lament began for many of us, after Donald Trump was elected. Bell acknowledges that even those of us that are critical of our country and it’s flawed systems still, on some level, believed at least something about what our place in this world was. What the United States could stand for, what goodness we could pull together to do if we used all that power in the right ways. We were capable of so much good. But the reality of what’s happening doesn’t reflect those beliefs. I had this personal moment of reckoning when I was thinking about the Muslims currently in internment camps in China. My immediate though was: “How can we help anyone else when we can’t even help ourselves?” I had never felt that way before. Before, I could either be proud of our country or disappointed in our country. Helplessness was an emotion, as an American with white privilege, I haden’t spent much time feeling. “There, on the poplars, we hung our harps.”

A great lament. A mourning for what we had, and what we thought we had.

An acceptance of our painful failures.

The second point that Bell made was in regards to exile. Exile can be a literal, physical banishment from one’s country or home. Or it can be an emotional expulsion. The anxiety I feel knowing that as a US citizen, the mobility and “freedom” that we’re used to owning has been largely curtailed, is intense. What a privilege we had. But the emotional exile is something interesting. A feeling of banishment, of loneliness, of losing the little faith I had in this country to keep us safe. The safety net I thought I had just doesn’t exist and that, more than anything, feels like abandonment.

I’m not bringing up these points to focus only on the negative, or to wallow in self pity. I bring these up to hopefully help others recognize that that sadness and grief for what we had, and thought we had, is real. And it will likely get worse and more intense before the upturn. But that’s the beauty about a lament – a loss, a grief process – once you allow yourself to feel it, you can move through it. With a clear head and a stronger heart you have the freedom to create something better, something new and previously assumed to be impossible. My hope, for all of us who make it to this next chapter in United States history, is that we have the courage to mourn what’s lost, let it go, and build something compassionate and new.

My Plans For The Real Life Vegan Wife

Today’s post is going to be short and simple – an overview of the new format for this blog moving forward.

I took a months-long “break” from writing to work on my business during the COVID-19 shutdown and spent countless hours thinking about how to tie all the pieces of my life together to reflect my moral framework and politics. I decided that The Real Life Vegan Wife may not be the most widely read, or shared, or followed blog, but it is being read. It’s even read on a regular basis, and by many people in my local community. That means everything to me. But it also means I should be doing better.

This blog started as a way for me to talk about me. As time passes and I evolve, I’m able to see its role in helping me to work through trauma, depression, post traumatic stress, anxiety, and immense sadness and grief. For the last year and a half I’ve been writing fairly consistently, I’ve been going to therapy once a week, and I’ve remained sober. I think these factors, coupled with veganism and fitness helped move my healing from just my body, and into my mind. I spent years making changes to every part of my life to help lift myself out of depression, but sobriety, matched with regular introspection and creativity gave me the clarity and the outlet necessary to mentally heal. Or at least begin healing. That topic is for a much longer conversation on a different day. My point is that in order to help others, you have to help yourself first. I feel ready to use this platform to do that.

Moving forward I plan to continue publishing new posts every Saturday at 12pm, Pacific time. My voice will be highlighted in two to three posts per month and I will continue to discuss, research and explore a variety of topics from my perspective. One Saturday per month I will highlight a voice other than my own. Currently my goal is to extend my Women in Business series to Black and Non-Black Women of Color in our local community. However, this section will not be limited to local interviews. In addition, I plan to share and highlight one creative, blogger, publication, business or brand per week that I want all of you to know about! The final Saturday will be dedicated solely to my “Monthly Resource Collection.” I like to think of it as my “favorites of the month,” but with a focus on social justice. This will be a concise and organized post briefly describing, listing, and linking all podcasts, books, articles, etc about everything from anti racism to veganism that I consumed that month so that you can easily find them and do the learning. I plan to also include fun products from brands owned by BIPOC as well.

In summary, moving forward The Real Life Vegan Wife will look something like this:

Weeks 1 & 2 (Sometimes 3 depending on the month): My Voice / My Thoughts

Week 3: Amplify Someone Else’s Voice

Week 4: Monthly Resource Collection

I’m excited for these changes. I hope you find them useful and inspiring!

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Art by Kristin @northerngraphicsco

*No, we do not have a pet goat… yet. This is me holding one at the fair last year.